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Six Of Literature's Most Memorable Teachers

Six Of Literature's Most Memorable Teachers

The school year is coming to an end. For most likely very different reasons, tired teachers and excited children are counting down the days until the long summer break. This got us thinking. Teachers are such an important part of our childhood - you’ll always remember a brilliant teacher, and you’ll always remember the teacher who scared the living daylights out of you. We’ve searched through our favourite books to bring you some of literature’s most memorable teachers, whether it’s for all the right or wrong reasons!

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 Miss Trunchbull

 Matilda by Roald Dahl

Memorable for all the wrong reasons, an all round despicable human - let alone a terrible teacher! She definitely has a lasting impact on any young reader, or perhaps viewer if you’ve seen the film or theatre production. What made her particularly awful was the way she abused her power; she got a thrill off making innocent children feel intimidated and belittled. Miss Trunchbull makes you grateful for that strict maths teacher you had who was always a bit too happy to give out detentions. We’d take line writing over Chokey anyday!

Professor Dumbledore

 Harry Potter by J.K Rowling

Wise, intelligent, and brave. Albus Dumbledore was respected by his pupils and colleagues in equal measure. The man had class, and he used his position as Headmaster for all the right reasons. Not only did he want the best for his students on an academic level, he cared for them on a personal level too. He wanted each of them to have the opportunities and choice to become good, moral, and decent people. Dumbledore was, and we don’t use this word lightly, a legend. He had great taste in sweets too. Sherbet lemon anyone?  

Miss Honey

Matilda by Roald Dahl

Sweet as her name, and the complete opposite of her horrible Aunt Trunchbull. Miss Honey cared for her students immensely. She used the very little power she had to build each one of them up - making them feel they were capable of anything they put their minds to. A great teacher is one who believes in you when the rest of the world doubts you.

Miss Stacy

Anne of Green Gables by L.M Montgomery

Miss Muriel Stacy makes this list because she, as a teacher, always prioritised what was most important: the happiness and the learning experience of her students. She was liberal and progressive and ignored the many critics who deemed her unorthodox and unprofessional. Miss Stacy believed in what she taught and the way she taught, and her students loved her for it. She was an inspiration and mentor to many of her pupils, particularly Anne, who chose a career in teaching because of her.

Lucy Snowe

Vilette by Charlotte Bronte

Lucy defeated the odds that were stacked against her from an early age, and used this experience of hardship to make her the best teacher she could be. Lucy sees the hidden strengths in those around her, and focuses on bringing them to the surface. Intelligent and hardworking, the progress she makes in her teaching career speaks volumes.

Professor Snape

Harry Potter by J.K Rowling

Snape’s a tricky one. A good teacher? No. A memorable teacher? Yes. Snape is a terrible teacher for a number of reasons, the main one being the way he belittles his students. He makes his less able students feel stupid, and his more able students feel afraid of progressing. A good teacher encourages their students to keep moving forward, and he halts students firmly in their tracks. Having said that, Snape’s loyalty, bravery, and intelligence is undeniable. He sacrificed himself for Harry and the good of the Wizarding World. His love for Lily meant he protected a boy who was a daily reminder of the torment and humiliation he faced as a student himself. That surely has to count for something.

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Which fictional teacher do you find most memorable, and why? What about real world teachers? If you have someone you'd love to say thank you to, you can shop our teacher and graduation gifts here

1 comment

Jul 06, 2017

How I came to be on this page is a bit of a mystery, but I’ve enjoyed the post. Reading about Miss Stacy and Anne of Green Gables was a bit of a heart tug. That was one of my most favourite books when I grew out of The Famous Five age and I didn’t miss an episode of the TV mini-series when it came out some years later. Thank you for the walk back down memory lane.

Gaelene

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